Itil service design pdf

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    Contents
  1. ITIL Service Design
  2. Focus On: Itil Service Design: Best Practice Insights
  3. ITIL® Service Design
  4. The ITIL® Service Design Book

ITIL® Service Design ciepredengunsee.ml IT. IL. ®. Se rvice. D e sig n. edition. BEST MANAGEM. EN. T PRACTICE PRODUCT. Service Design according to ITIL® ciepredengunsee.ml This ebook is the 2nd volume of our series „ITSM Processes according to ITIL® “ based. Design services to satisfy business objectives, based on the quality, compliance, risk and ITIL, in particular service design, is built primarily upon the four Ps.

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Itil Service Design Pdf

ITIL V3 – Service Design. - Page 2 of The ITIL Core consists of five publications. Each provides the guidance necessary for an integrated approach, as. Purpose. • Providing and maintaining a single source of consistent information on all operational services. (service catalogue) and those being. for value creation. Figure Sourcing of Service Management practice. Figure ITIL Core. The Metrics Tree. Design constraints driven by strategy. External.

Still unsure about beginning your certification journey in ITIL? Now on to the five core components of ITIL. The objective of Service Strategy is, therefore, to provide a definition of strategy and governance control. The utility and warranty of this component are designed to ensure that the service is fit for purpose and fit for use, respectively. Ensuring this is important as these two components are what add value in the delivery of services to customers. Service Strategy Process The Service Strategy process is concerned with the development of service concepts in preparation for the selection of services to be provided. The Service Portfolio Management process is concerned with management of services that concern information in the Service Portfolio. Service Portfolio Management organizes the process by which services are identified, described, evaluated, selected, and chartered. Demand Management Process The Demand Management process is concerned with understanding and influencing customer demand. Demand Management models demand in terms of: User Profiles, which characterize different typical groups of users for a given service. Patterns of Business Activity, which represent the way users in different user profiles access a service over the course of a given time period. Financial Management Process IT Financial Management provides a means of understanding and managing costs and opportunities associated with services in financial terms. IT Financial Management includes three basic activities: Accounting: Tracking how money is actually spent by a Service Provider Budgeting: Planning how money will be spent by a Service Provider Charging: Securing payment from customers for services provided Strategy Operations Strategy Operations ensure that services like fulfilling user requests, resolving service failures, fixing problems, and carrying out routine operational tasks, are performed efficiently and effectively. They are: 1.

You will want to have a good understanding of the following definitions, because these terms are used frequently in the Service Design publication. Definitions can be accessed at http: A service management approach helps make the business more successful, reduces disruption, and lowers costs, while increasing revenue. Your ability to deliver quality service depends on both the quality of the assets you acquire and how well you manage them. An IT service is made up of a combination of information technology, people and processes.

A customer-facing IT service directly supports the business processes of one or more customers and its service level targets should be defined in a service level agreement. Other IT services, called supporting services, are not directly used by the business but are required by the service provider to deliver customer-facing services. The Service Design publication provides a broad and detailed overview of the five aspects of service design. These include: Standardize, Standardize, Standardize Chapter 1 of the Service Design publication describes the value of ITIL and other frameworks, which represent standardized best practices, as opposed to internal, proprietary knowledge that is difficult to share, transfer, or adopt.

See Service Management. See Service Asset. See IT Service. And if the house. For example. Focus on integrating your The right people. Summary Pay close attention to the sections on service management as a practice and service design principles. Products services. IT organizations should focus on architecting and designing their infrastructure to meet governance codes and business requirements.

Will they help my company increase performance and growth and stay ahead of the competition? In Northern Europe. These fundamentals will help you determine how to prioritize work in service design. Some organizations may get sidetracked by giving priority to the group that is most vocal. Ask yourself: They will also help you understand where the SLA objectives fit in. Service Management as a Practice It may seem obvious.

For more information. The architect and builder must adhere to these requirements just like IT organizations must adhere to codes and standards. By doing so. On the other hand. By focusing first on business priorities. These can be viewed the same way as governance codes for the services IT provides.

ITIL V2 discusses the importance of people. Keep in mind that if the services are useful and valuable. Getting back to the home design analogy. Besides visible success. ITIL V3 takes service management to the next level by discussing not only how IT must align itself with business objectives. Significant points stressed in this chapter are value creation. Warranty of Service This chapter provides guidance on warranty of service.

You create a competitive advantage when you are able to deliver a certain level of warranty to your customers. Customers can become very frustrated with a service that is fit for their purpose but lacks sufficient warranty for their use. BMC Software 5 Stakeholders Everyone in the organization should be considered a stakeholder for service management.

These are the main process areas in service design. Utility of Service Customers want to achieve business outcomes by using services that are fit for their purpose. These stake- holders and the organizational stakeholders are an example of the agency principle. Many of the services IT provides are considered commodities. Use one or more of the service management processes to drive these improvements.

Resources are direct inputs to produce a service. Processes Processes have inputs or triggers. Service Lifecycle The service lifecycle is dynamic. Capabilities and resources within or external to the organization enable processes. These should be supported by SLAs. You can create differentiation and retain customers by developing distinctive capabilities that are difficult for your competitors to replicate. Service design makes you focus on the activities most important to the business and prioritize work according to business requirements.

Service management emphasizes the need to take a holistic approach to design. Specialization and coordination across the lifecycle are very important for the delivery and support of services.

Processes are executed by people and sometimes are enabled by technology implementa- tions. You should be able to identify and count the results. Governance ensures that the required processes are executed correctly. The process should be traceable to a specific trigger. The service lifecycle should work as an integrated system that includes feedback mechanisms for continual improvement.

Processes also have metrics and deliver primary results to a customer in the form of services. When processes are collaborative and integrated appropriately. Processes should follow enterprise governance standards. Processes must: Processes should also be efficient. By focusing first on business They must also be cost-effective. An increase in large volumes of data. With these improved service levels. To meet these challenges. In addition. The quality and the agility of service the company can offer customers have increased dramatically.

Value can be expressed in a number of ways. At the same time. A telecommunications company that employs nearly 6. The company can understand and predict how technology changes will impact the business and how changes in the business need will impact the technology infrastructure. Some of the goals of service design include: It emphasizes the need to approach design in a holistic manner by looking at the entire service lifecycle and processes from the beginning.

Remember that services should not be designed in isolation. Service Design Principles In the housing example. It also reviews the roles and involvement of stakeholders. When designing services. The publication explains how to take a holistic approach that considers the service and its components and how to deliver the functionality needed. You should components related to the also be able to identify how new services will impact processes.

Documentation and Design Document information pertaining to the requirements of When designing services. All parties involved should have a clear understanding of the goals.

ITIL Service Design

How quickly a house can be built depends on who you hire as a general contractor. This includes.

This chapter reviews the importance of assigning project managers to manage the requirements-gathering process for a new service or for a major change to an existing service. Consider functionality and resources for all stages of the service lifecycle. Does the house meet your needs. Identify and document the business justification.

The service portfolio will help you understand: Be aware of the audit trail necessary for compliance and governance requirements. BMC Software 11 There are many factors to consider in design activities. Designing the Service Portfolio The service portfolio is a critical management system for designed. If you discover that the soil where you want to build your house is toxic or that the design is incompatible with surrounding homes e.

All mechanisms and functionality in the new service should be managed and improved through the life of the service to meet all of the agreed-upon service levels. Follow a holistic approach. When you collect your data. In the home design analogy. Be sure to retain information on all of these requirements for new services. This information impacts changes on facilities. The service catalog becomes an integral part of the service portfolio. Collecting this information is the most important stage for designing and delivering new services or changing existing ones.

Business drivers and needs will change during design and delivery stages. IT service continuity management. Processes in the design phase should be clearly defined and documented. To avoid confusion. In each section. The service design processes within ITIL are summarized as follows: Include details about the service name.

This section reviews the various enterprise architecture frameworks and discusses how the enterprise architecture is integrated with the business architecture. The Service Design publication cautions against over- designing. Build your basic home today. Service Design Principles Refer to the Service Design publication for the information you should capture for each service in the service portfolio. Go through the service design processes with the different architectures to make adjustments focused on one service you will probably need to adjust the level of details in the service diagrams.

Completing this process for each service is easier than performing it simultaneously for many services after you realize you need to adjust the level of detail. This architecture should help support the end-to-end management of the technology used. IT owners. Key roles include: The enterprise architecture should include architecture for the following: This chapter explains the importance of understanding the roles of processes and people. Take a realistic look at how your existing can support a given service.

Measurement Systems. These processes cannot be completed simultaneously.

BMC Software 13 When one approach works. You likely will get bogged down quickly if you design processes for your complete infrastructure and services at once.

You build the basement or slab. They should have process owners. Designing Processes. KPIs measure the business health of the enterprise and ensure all stakeholders are following a strategy The success of any performance and common goals.

For each process. KPIs put performance in context by setting thresholds. The success of any performance management program is contingent on selecting correct. ITIL recommends aggregating metrics into a metrics tree or key performance indicator KPI tree and to develop automated measurement systems based on this approach.

Processes must be monitored and measured the Continual Service Improvement publication contains a detailed overview of metrics and measurements. Process control focuses on performing processes effectively. When you build a house. Four types of metrics are commonly used to measure how well a process is performing: KPIs should: See the Service Design publication for a sample metrics tree based on a typical balanced scorecard.

Processes should be driven by objectives and include metrics reports and process improvement. Most importantly. The right dashboard can provide useful information about the performance of the organization and can be used to help in decision making. This section offers guidance for automating measurement and aggregating metrics.

The introduction of service management processes may actually lead to an increase in the number of reported incidents. Doing so will support the ability of senior managers — whose responsibilities span multiple processes — to take a service-oriented view. This way of looking at metrics takes into consideration the service and customer metrics.

Be careful what you measure. An owner — individual or group — must be associated with the KPI. Executive dashboards should aggregate and consolidate data into higher-level information on particular business services.

This section explains how dashboards should provide various views of information based on the role of the person accessing that information. Data interpretation is also an art in itself. Service Design Principles comprehend and as actionable as possible.

Dashboards should correlate consolidated data across IT processes. The reason for this could be that. As technology becomes more integrated with business requirements. As a result. BMC Software 15 Figure 1.

This chapter of the Service Design publication addresses how this approach will help break down technology silos. Business service management is performed by business units.

See Business Service Management. Co-sourcing might expedite the time to market. Most important. IT environment. Stay focused on what is needed to integrate IT objectives with business objectives. ITIL recommends considering people. Consider these examples of the value of BSM across a broad spectrum of industries: Service Design Models The Service Design publication provides a useful checklist of the advantages and disadvantages of various service delivery strategies.

Before you decide to outsource. The type of service delivery approach to use depends upon the unique needs of the organization. To do this effectively. The catalog is important for delivering BSM. Cloud will help with agility and on-demand service needs. Summary IT is an essential part of the business and. The strategies cover insourcing. BSM supports governance requirements. ITIL also discusses the importance of having a totally integrated service catalog.

BSM helps you prioritize As technology becomes more activities based on business impact and urgency. In requirements. Include positive and negative risk management. Produce the SDP and coordinate assets.

Establish oversight for efficiency and effectiveness. Follow a continual improvement approach see the Continual Service Improvement publication and log all improvement ideas in a continual service improvement register. Activities within design coordination are: Define a holistic approach for consistency and accuracy in designs.

A key deliverable from this process is consistent and quality solutions. Balance and prioritization address the utility and warranty of the service as well as the needs of the service throughout its lifecycle. Design Coordination Design coordination ensures collaboration during the The primary focus of service design stage of the lifecycle. Project management should also be aware of the dynamics of associating one project with another for the success of the service management program.

All design activities and catalog management is processes across the service project or service change to have a single source of are managed by a single point of control. Integration with project management is especially important. Organizations can maintain and integrate their service portfolio and catalog as part of their service knowledge management system SKMS. Forecasting and Planning. Supporting services are IT services that underpin the customer-facing services.

Service Definition. Query and Analysis. Customer-facing services are IT services that support business outcomes from the customer perspective. Collaborate Incident. A service catalog enables all areas of the business to have a common. Process Data and Information. The primary focus of service catalog management is to have a single source of accurate information on the agreed-upon services and to make sure that the roles requiring this type of information have access to it.

The catalog should list the operational services you have. The more details that are identified up front. Service Design Processes network services. This information impacts changes to facilities, processes, service transactions, and SLA targets. Be sure to retain information about these requirements for new services, along with process dependencies, business cycles, transaction levels, and future growth.

Identify and document the business justification, predicted level of change, and level of support needed. Collecting this information is important for designing and delivering new services or changing existing ones.

Be aware of the audit trail necessary for compliance and governance requirements. When you collect data, you must get the appropriate signatures for approval. You must also have a formal process for agreeing to and accepting changes to evolving requirements. Designing Technology and Management Architectures ITIL recommends that IT planners, designers, and service architects understand the business requirements, the underpinning services, future direction, and current technology.

This helps ensure they can develop appropriate IT architecture for use now and in the future. This architecture should help support the end-to-end management of the technology used.

Ideally, you should align roles and processes with business objectives. The Service Design publication cautions against over-designing. When designs and architectures are too complex, they are more challenging to put in place and support.

Take a realistic look at how the existing architecture can support a given service. Build the basic home today, but prepare the design to expand as necessary e. When one approach works, use that method to extend the resources to other services. You will likely get bogged down if you design processes for complete infrastructure and services at once. A service-focused approach is a better option. Process control focuses on performing processes effectively, efficiently, and consistently.

This makes them more consistent and manageable. Processes should be driven by objectives and include metrics reports and process improvement. They should have process owners who are responsible for both the process and its improvement. Processes must be monitored and measured, typically with four types of metrics: progress, compliance, effectiveness, and efficiency.

Metrics can be aggregated into a metrics tree or key performance indicator KPI tree. You can create automated measurement systems based on this approach. KPIs measure the business health of the enterprise and ensure all stakeholders are following a strategy and common goals.

While metrics show a number that reflects performance, KPIs put performance in context by setting thresholds, targets, and benchmarks. For each process, specify an optimum number of KPIs that are easy to comprehend and as actionable as possible. An owner individual or group must be associated with the KPI.

Additionally, gain executive support to help overcome political obstacles. Be careful what you measure! The metrics will influence behavior—and not always in a positive manner.

For example, measuring average call time may tempt service desk agents to disconnect an unsolved call. Data interpretation is also an art in itself. The introduction of service management processes may lead to an increase in the number of reported incidents. The reason for this could be that users never contacted the service desk before because they believed their issues would not be addressed.

Stay focused on what you need to integrate IT objectives with business objectives. Most important, consider these objectives as a whole and not in isolation. Define and document your processes, and, to avoid confusion, clearly define roles and responsibilities too. Negotiate, agree on, and document IT service targets with the business.

Track and report on service delivery performance. Design Coordination Design coordination ensures collaboration during the design stage of the lifecycle. All design activities and processes across the service project or service change are managed by a single point of control. Key deliverables from this process are consistent and quality solutions, designs, and service design package s SDPs that will deliver and support business outcomes.

The primary focus of service catalog management is to have a single source of accurate information, accessible by the roles requiring this type of information. The central principles in design coordination are balance, prioritization, and integration with project management. Balance and prioritization address the utility and warranty of a service, as well as the needs of the service throughout its lifecycle. Integration with project management is especially important.

Project management specialization combined with service design specialization helps to ensure success. Project management should also be aware of the dynamics of associating one project with another. For example, a configuration management database CMDB project on its own will provide some value.

But associating it with an incident management project will provide more value than the two projects alone. Service Catalog Management Service catalog management is an important concept. The catalog should list the operational services you have, why they are there, who owns them, which customers have signed up for them, and the desired business value of these services. A service catalog enables all areas of the business to have a common, consistent, and accurate view of IT services and the business services they support.

Customer- facing services are IT services that support business outcomes from the customer perspective. Supporting services are IT services that underpin the customer-facing services.

These include database services, network services, relationships, and processes or technical services. The service catalog can have many views depending on the decisions the consumer of the information needs to make. How can you make the service catalog management process successful?

Ensure that the catalog contains reliable information and that the business is aware of the services provided. IT must also understand the technology used to support services. Service transition problems can occur when the data in the catalog is inaccurate or not under rigorous change control.

If information is too detailed it will be difficult to maintain. Conversely, if the information is too high level it will not relay enough detail. This includes monitoring, measuring, and reporting on how well the service provider delivered the agreed-on service levels.

When targets are appropriate and met, the business and IT have a better chance of aligning. SLM should manage expectations and perceptions. This requires establishing and maintaining service level agreements SLAs with developing and managing operational level agreements OLAs.

Agreements may include the payroll system, billing system and help desk. For example, a three-level structure could focus on the corporate level, which covers generic SLM issues; the customer level, which includes all issues for a particular customer group, regardless of the service used; and the service level, which covers all SLM issues relevant to the specific service for a specific customer group.

For example, automated customer surveys can provide valuable insight into service performance.

Focus On: Itil Service Design: Best Practice Insights

Make sure to keep all agreements, underpinning contracts, and OLAs up to date. That means that they should be under change management control and reviewed to ensure they are correct and align to the needs of the business. If the agreements are recorded as CIs within the CMS, it is easier to understand the impact of the changes and to implement them effectively. This chapter reviews many of the activities related to SLM processes.

It discusses the need to develop contracts and build a relationship with the business. Capacity Management The purpose of capacity management is to ensure that IT can provide cost-justifiable capacity to meet the current and future needs of the business. These needs may change often. For example, discounts or promotions on the web store may increase traffic to the site.

ITIL® Service Design

Effective capacity management requires understanding both the IT and business environments and the potential need for new services. With the right processes, you will be able to determine which components to upgrade and when, how much the upgrade will cost, and whether you can justify it.

You can use capacity management to forecast the impact of events, such as a spike in the number of end users. With the right strategy in place, you will be able to plan for the costs and resources required, and balance supply against demand. It also requires preparing for variations based on the time of day, season, product changes, and sale or promotion periods. This preparation requires integration with the business to ensure IT is ready for any and all business initiatives that will impact capacity.

The company advertised the sale widely, but failed to notify IT. Capacity Plan ITIL recommends publishing an annual capacity plan that incorporates business capacity management, service capacity management, and component capacity management.

This automation allows you to act to reduce the impact of situations that can occur when targets are breached or threatened. By continually monitoring and measuring the capacity of each system and component, you will be immediately alerted when something happens to compromise capacity. Activities can be proactive, such as taking necessary actions before they impact the business. For example, you can conduct modeling to help measure impact, budget for upgrades, and improve service performance. Activities can also be reactive.

These may include monitoring, reporting, and reviewing performance; responding to threshold events; initiating corrective action; and responding to performance issues. This will help you develop a service strategy, and review and improve IT strategies, policies, and technology architectures. Capacity management should also play an active role in the support, negotiation, and verification of SLAs.

You can then use this information to negotiate the SLA based on the business value you are to deliver. Effective capacity management requires knowing the priority of business services. You may need to implement some upgrades to ensure future capacity.

You may consider these long-term activities due to the cost being high or the consequences of not upgrading not being significant. With the right demand management processes in place, you should be able to understand which services are using which resources. If the IT organization charges for services, consider offering financial incentives. These could be lower fees for work done at times when there is less demand, for example. The appropriate level of availability should be incorporated into the service design strategy from the beginning.

This ensures that availability targets are measured and achieved. One of the objectives of capacity management is to predict the behavior of IT services. You should be able to get accurate forecasts that will help adjust your capacity plan to meet desired business objectives. Capacity management can improve costs by reducing over-capacity and disruptions that impact customers. Availability Management Availability management helps to ensure that the level of availability for services meets or exceeds existing and future business needs.

To make this happen, you must understand business processes, future plans and requirements, service targets, IT infrastructure data, and business impact. While availability can generate reactive processes, the key is to make objectives more proactive.

You can predict, preempt, and prevent downtime through effectively automating and integrating processes and technology. Availability is often measured as a percentage, as described in the Service Design publication. The Service Design publication uses the example of an ATM, where getting cash may be vital, but having a printed receipt may not be as critical. Availability management processes must consider availability from both a business and IT perspective. Users care about the frequency of downtime, the duration, and the scope of the impact.

To measure this, be sure to look at the user minutes lost and the impact by transaction. Focus measurements on how the availability of vital business functions impacts the business. Availability should be agreed to by the business and should identify the following: The minimum available level of functionality for the service The level at which service response is considered unavailable Where to measure functionality and response How much weight should be given to partial service availability What happens to the availability of the whole service if one location is impacted You can determine the cost to the business by combining tangible costs, such as lost productivity, lost revenue, and wasted goods, with intangible ones, such as damage to reputation, loss of business opportunity and profit erosion.

A matrix is created with IT services on one edge and CIs on the other. This allows you to identify critical CIs that could cause multiple IT services to fail and fragile IT services that have multiple single points of failure. You can use this approach to identify measures that prevent or minimize how a component failure impacts the business.

For example, the CFIA can show component recovery timings and component- and people-related dependencies. Other types of analysis include locating a single point of failure and its impact, along with a fault tree analysis FTA to determine how a chain of events can disrupt services. A conditional event occurs only when certain conditions happen, such as when the air conditioning goes down.

Trigger events can happen when detection equipment identifies an automatic shutdown of services. Most businesses want their services percent available during business hours. Yet at night or on weekends, the requirements might be less critical, and scheduled changes can occur with minimal risk. IT Service Continuity Management IT service continuity management ITSCM focuses on supporting overall business continuity management by helping you define the process responsible for managing risks that could seriously impact IT services.

This happens by reducing the risk to an acceptable level and planning for the recovery of IT services. Initiation 2. Requirements and strategy 3. In this phase of the life cycle, the design is built, tested and moved into production to enable the business customer to achieve the desired value.

This phase addresses managing changes such as controlling the assets and configuration items e. Additionally, the phase handles service validation, and testing and transition planning, the latter ensuring that users, support personnel and the production environment have been prepared for the release to production. Change Management The objective of this process activity is to control the lifecycle of all the changes. The primary objective of Change Management is to enable beneficial changes to be made with minimum disruption to IT services.

Change Evaluation The objective of the change evaluation process is to assess major changes, like the introduction of a new service or a substantial change to an existing service, before those changes are allowed to proceed to the next phase in their lifecycle.

Project Management Transition Planning and Support This process is aimed at planning and coordinating use of resources to deploy a major release within the predicted cost, time and quality estimates.

Application Development This makes available the applications and systems which provide the required functionality of IT services. This process includes the development and maintenance of custom applications as well as the customization of products from software vendors.

Release and Deployment Management The objective of this process is to plan, schedule and control the movement of releases to test and live environments. The primary goal is to ensure that the integrity of the live environment is protected and that the correct components are released. Service Validation and Testing This ensures that deployed releases and the resulting services meet customer expectations, and to verify that IT operations is able to support the new service.

Service Asset and Configuration Management The objective is to maintain information about Configuration Items required to deliver an IT service, including their relationships. Knowledge Management The objective is to gather, analyze, store and share knowledge and information within an organization. The primary purpose of Knowledge Management is to improve efficiency by reducing the need to rediscover knowledge.

Incident Management The objective is to manage the lifecycle of all Incidents. The primary objective of Incident Management is to return the IT service to users as quickly as possible.

The ITIL® Service Design Book

Request Fulfilment The objective is to fulfill Service Requests, which in most cases are minor Changes e. Access Management The objective is to grant authorized users the right to use a service, while preventing access to unauthorized users.

The Access Management processes essentially execute policies defined in Information Security Management. Problem Management The process objective is to manage the lifecycle of all problems. The primary objectives of Problem Management are to prevent Incidents from happening, and to minimize the impact of incidents that cannot be prevented.

Proactive Problem Management analyzes incident records, and uses data collected by other IT Service Management processes to identify trends or significant problems. The process objective of IT Operations Control is to execute day-to-day routine tasks related to the operation of infrastructure components and applications.

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